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ENG101 Assignment 2 Solution Spring 2018

Q1. Writers use different techniques to bring their characters to life. They use these techniques to translate their vision of people using words. Some extracts from different writings are given below. In each paragraph, identify the technique used by the writer for “character representation”.                                                                                 (2*5=10 Marks)

 

Choose an appropriate technique from the following:     

  • In action
  • In speech
  • By direct statement
  • By choice of words and picking out a particular feature or detail
  • By associating the character with a point of view

 

  1. “Who’s there? Betty?”—“Yes, madam.”— “Where’s your master?”—“He’s without, madam; he hath sent me for a shirt to lend a poor naked man, who hath been robbed and murdered.”— “your master is a pretty sort of a man, to take in naked vagabonds, and clothe them with his own clothes. I shall have no such doings. If you offer to touch anything, I’ll throw the chamber-pot at your head. Go, send your master to me.”—“Yes, madam,”

 

  1. Joe, throwing the door wide open, and finding an obstruction behind it, immediately divined the cause, and applied Tickler to its further investigation. She concluded by throwing me. Joe, who, glad to get hold of me on any terms, passed me on into the chimney and quietly fenced me up there with his great leg.

 

  1. He was an excellent scholar. He was a perfect master of the Greek and Latin languages; to which he added a great share of knowledge in the Oriental tongues; and could read and translate French, Italian, and Spanish. He had applied many years to the most severe study, and had treasured up a fund of learning rarely to be met with in a university. He was, besides, a man of good sense, good parts, and good nature; but was at the same time as entirely ignorant of the ways of this world as an infant just entered into it could possibly be. As he had never any intention to deceive, so he never suspected such a design in others.

 

  1. Joseph Andrews, the hero of our ensuing history, was esteemed to be the only son of Gaffar and Gammer Andrews, and brother to the illustrious Pamela, whose virtue is at present so famous. As to his ancestors, we have searched with great diligence, but little success; being unable to trace them farther than his great-grandfather, who, as an elderly person in the parish remembers to have heard his father say, was an excellent cudgel-player.

 

  1. Uncle Pumblechook: a large hard breathing middle-aged slow man, with a mouth like a fish, dull staring eyes, and sandy hair standing upright on his head, so that he looked as if he had just been all but choked, and had that moment come to; ‘I have brought you, as the compliments of the season – I have brought you, Mum, a bottle of sherry wine – and I have brought you, Mum, a bottle of port wine.’

Q2. One vital concept of reading comprehension is to evaluate texts. Two passages have been given to evaluate the writer’s intention regarding running on a treadmill. Read the passages carefully and compare them by answering the multiple choice questions given below.                                                                                                                     (2*5=10 Marks)

Passage (1)

The treadmill began to whir, and I gripped its handlebars as the belt started moving me backwards.  All I could do now was run — or begrudgingly barrel forward — toward an outdated screen that showed me the terrain I was supposed to be running on.  It was made of red squares stacked up, one on top of another: the higher stacks were supposed to be steep hills, and the lower ones, valleys.  I tried to picture them as burning coals to see if that would make me speed up or at least feel like this exercise was somehow connected to nature — even one of its cruel parts.

Passage (2)

The treadmill began to whir, and my heart sped up faster than the belt could go. Instead of pressing “select” on my remote control to escape into a TV show, I had just selected “Power Run.”  A sleek screen with a simple set of red lines showed me the terrain on which I was running.  Those red lines looked like a pulse, and they got me to run farther and faster than I could ever run when I’m outside, worried about weather, cars, or other people.  It may not have looked like I was going anywhere that night, but I had just broken out of a ten-year slump.

 

  1. How would you describe this author’s attitude towards the treadmill in Passage 1?           
  1. Positive
  2. Negative
  3. Neutral
  4. Formal

 

  1. How would you describe this author’s attitude towards the treadmill in Passage 2? 
  1. Positive
  2. Negative
  3. Neutral
  4. Formal

 

  1. In passage 1, imagination of the author, “the red squares as burning coals” shows that: 
  1. It is pleasant.
  2. It is normal.
  3. It does not sound pleasant.
  4. It is weird.

 

  1. In passage 2, “heart sped up faster than the belt could” shows: 
  1. Intensity
  2. Anger
  3. Motivation
  4. Confusion

 

  1. In passage 2, “they got me to run farther and faster than I could ever run when I’m outside” shows:
  1. The desire of running faster
  2. The speed of the author
  3. Benefits of running inside
  4. Drawbacks of running on the treadmill

SOLUTION:

Q1.

  • By direct statement
  • In action
  • By associating the character with a point of view
  • By choice of words and picking out a particular feature or detail
  • In speech

Q2

  • Negative
  • Positive
  • It does not sound pleasant
  • Intensity
  • Benefits of running inside
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