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ENG101 English Comprehension Assignment 5 Solution Fall 2012

Q1: Recall your knowledge of Transitional words discussed in English comprehension course and Identify transitional words and phrases used in this passage, also indicate function they are serving in this passage.
(Marks 10)
Novel: Emma
by Jane Austen

Emma continued to entertain no doubt of her being in love. Her ideas only varied as to the how much. At first, she thought it was a good deal; and afterwards, but little. She had great pleasure in hearing Frank Churchill talked of; and, for his sake, greater pleasure than ever in seeing Mr. and Mrs. Weston; she was very often thinking of him, and quite impatient for a letter, that she might know how he was, how were his spirits, how was his aunt, and what was the chance of his coming to Randalls again this spring. But, on the other hand, she could not admit herself to be unhappy, nor, after the first morning, to be less disposed for employment than usual; she was still busy and cheerful; and, pleasing as he was, she could yet imagine him to have faults; and farther, though thinking of him so much, and, as she sat drawing or working, forming a thousand amusing schemes for the progress and close of their attachment, fancying interesting dialogues, and inventing elegant letters; the conclusion of every imaginary declaration on his side was that she refused him. Their affection was always to subside into friendship. Every thing tender and charming was to mark their parting; but still they were to part. When she became sensible of this, it struck her that she could not be very much in love; for in spite of her previous and fixed determination never to quit her father, never to marry, a strong attachment certainly must produce more of a struggle than she could foresee in her own feelings.

Idea Solution:

ANSWER:

TRANSITIONAL WORDS                                                         FUNCTION

No doubt                                                                                TO CONCEDE

At first                                                                                      TO ADD

And                                                                                           TO ADD

Afterward                                                                                  TO PUT IN ORDER

But                                                                                          TO CONTRAST

On the other hand                                                                  TO ADD

Nor                                                                                             TO REFUSE

And  farther                                                                               TO ADD

The conclusion                                                                          TO CONCLUDE

For  inspite                                                                                  TO GIVE  AN EXaMPLE

Never                                                                                           TO REFUSE

Then                                                                                            TO ADD

Transitional words

Transitional words and phrases are clues in an essay that tell you exactly what is coming ahead.  For example, if you see “in conclusion,” you can rest assured the conclusion to the essay has arrived.  Below are a list of transitional words and where you should use them.

To Add:  Also, and, and then, too, plus, in addition, furthermore, moreover, again, on top of that, another, first, second, third.

To Put In Time Order:  Now, then, before, after, afterwards, earlier, later, immediately, soon, next, in a few days, meanwhile, gradually, suddenly, finally, previously.

To Put In Space Order:  Near, near to, far, far from, in front of, beside, in the rear of, beyond, above, below, to the right, to the left, around, surrounding, on one side, inside, outside, alongside.

To Compare:  In the same way, similarly, just like, just as, likewise.

To Contrast:  But, still, however, on the other hand, on the contrary, yet, nevertheless, despite, in spite of, even though, in contrast.

To Show Cause and Effect:  Because, since, so, consequently, as a result, therefore, then, accordingly, hence, thus.

To Show Purpose:  For this reason, for this purpose, so that this may happen.

To Emphasize:  Indeed, in fact, surely, necessarily, certainly, without any doubt, in any event, truly, again, to repeat.

To Give Examples:  For example, for instance, as an illustration, specifically, to be specific, as proof, to illustrate, to show, namely.

To Summarize:  In summary, in conclusion, as I have shown, as has been stated, in other words, in brief, to sum up, hence, finally.

To Concede:  Of course, to be sure, certainly, granted.

 

Q2: Read the spatial description of East End of London and underline the location expressions that are used to guide the reader through the description.
(Marks 5)

East End of London
The East End of London, also known simply as the East End, is the area of London, England, east of the medieval walled City of London and north of the River Thames. Although not defined by universally accepted formal boundaries, the River Lea can be considered another boundary.
Official attempts to address the overcrowded housing began at the beginning of the 20th century under the London County Council. The Second World War devastated much of the East End, with its docks, railways and industry forming a continual target for bombing, especially during the Blitz, leading to dispersal of the population to new suburbs and new housing being built in the 1950s. The Canary Wharf development, improved infrastructure, and the Olympic Park mean that the East End is undergoing further change, but some parts continue to contain some of the worst poverty in Britain.

Solution:

East End of London:

 

The East End of London, also known simply as the .East end, is the area of London, England, east of the medieval walled City of London and north of the River Thames. Although not defined by universally accepted formal boundaries, the River Lea can be considered another boundary.

Official attempts to address the overcrowded housing began at the beginning of the 20th century under the London country council. The Second World War devastated much of the East End, with its docks, railways and industry forming a continual target for bombing, especially during the Blitz, leading to dispersal of the population to new suburbs and new housing being built in the 1950s. The Canary Wharf development, improved infrastructure, and the Olympic Park mean that the East End is undergoing further change, but some parts continue to contain some of the worst poverty in Britain.

 

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