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MGT503 Principles of Management GDB Solution Spring 2014

Learning Objectives:

  • To help the student in understanding the levels of management.
  • To sharpen their analytical skills in understanding and distinguish between the managers levels and their skills

You have read three levels of management.

Question: Is a manager’s scope of responsibility always related to management level? Why or why not?. Discuss your point of view with solid arguments.

Solution: A manager may be a first level manager who supervises employees directly or a second level manager who manages supervisors. The size of the company usually determines which. The duties and responsibilities of a first line manager are similar to those of a supervisor although the manager generally has more personnel responsibility, more HR responsibility, and more discretion. He or she usually supervises a small group of employees doing the same or similar work. The manager usually has approximately 1 to 3 years of experience. Managers typically report to senior managers, directors, vice presidents, or owners.

Managers just don’t go out and haphazardly perform their responsibilities. Good managers discover how to master five basic functions: planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling.

  • Planning: This step involves mapping out exactly how to achieve a particular goal. Say, for example, that the organization’s goal is to improve company sales. The manager first needs to decide which steps are necessary to accomplish that goal. These steps may include increasing advertising, inventory, and sales staff. These necessary steps are developed into a plan. When the plan is in place, the manager can follow it to accomplish the goal of improving company sales.
  • Organizing: After a plan is in place, a manager needs to organize her team and materials according to her plan. Assigning work and granting authority are two important elements of organizing.
  • Staffing: After a manager discerns his area’s needs, he may decide to beef up his staffing by recruiting, selecting, training, and developing employees. A manager in a large organization often works with the company’s human resources department to accomplish this goal.
  • Leading: A manager needs to do more than just plan, organize, and staff her team to achieve a goal. She must also lead. Leading involves motivating, communicating, guiding, and encouraging. It requires the manager to coach, assist, and problem solve with employees.
  • Controlling: After the other elements are in place, a manager’s job is not finished. He needs to continuously check results against goals and take any corrective actions necessary to make sure that his area’s plans remain on track.

All managers at all levels of every organization perform these functions, but the amount of time a manager spends on each one depends on both the level of management and the specific organization.

Roles performed by managers

A manager wears many hats. Not only is a manager a team leader, but he or she is also a planner, organizer, cheerleader, coach, problem solver, and decision maker — all rolled into one. And these are just a few of a manager’s roles.

In addition, managers’ schedules are usually jam‐packed. Whether they’re busy with employee meetings, unexpected problems, or strategy sessions, managers often find little spare time on their calendars. (And that doesn’t even include responding to e‐mail!)

In his classic book, The Nature of Managerial Work, Henry Mintzberg describes a set of ten roles that a manager fills. These roles fall into three categories:

 

  • Interpersonal: This role involves human interaction.
  • Informational: This role involves the sharing and analyzing of information.
  • Decisional: This role involves decision making.

Table 1 contains a more in‐depth look at each category of roles that help managers carry out all five functions described in the preceding “Functions of Managers” section.

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